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Curling Legends Podcast

A weekly conversation with the players and storytellers who shaped Curling in the 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s.
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A weekly conversation with the players and storytellers of the 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s.

Subscribe to the Curling Legends Podcast email list to receive updates during the curling season and be reminded when new shows are released.

You can also listen on iTunes or Stitcher or use other podcast apps such as Downcast or Pocket Casts on your mobile phone. You can also listen on GooglePlay, iHeartRadio and TuneIn Radio.

If you are a curler from years ago and want to share a story from your era, please email me at contact@curlinglegends.ca

Dec 19, 2016

Errol Klinck, better known as "Colonel", started curling in Regina with his father.  His grandfather, Ozzie Barkwell, skipped the team representing Western Canada at the first Brier, held in Toronto in 1927.  After moving to Winnipeg, Colonel landed a sparing role, filling in for Bryan Wood and helping the Duguid rink capture the Birks Trophy (Main Event) in the 1971 MCA Bonspiel.  Errol would skip his own team to the same title in 1974, winning a berth into the provincial Tankard and the Calcutta at the Assiniboine Memorial.  The Klinck rink of 1985 had been together a few years, mostly competing in the A Group mens league at the Assiniboine.  After escaping club playdowns, and managing to win a city zone berth, they were heading to the provincial Tankard in Dauphin, seeded last out of 32 teams in the double-knockout event.  Surprising everyone (including themselves), they began the Saturday night A-Side final as the only undefeated team, with just two wins remaining to capture four Purple Hearts and a trip to the Brier.

Errol shares memories of that Tankard, grandpa Ozzie, and curling in Regina and Winnipeg.  He talks about the Eaton Curling Club, reading ice at the Assiniboine, and reminisces on the teams he battled through the years.

For more stories of Winnipeg curling, check out Sean Grassie's "King of the Rings" and "Curling Capital: Winnipeg and the Roarin' Game, 1876 to 1988" by Morris Mott and John Allardyce.

Next Week: Warren Hansen

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